Category: Highlights

Health workforce shortage weakens AIDS response

Health workforce shortage weakens AIDS response

While the U.S. government has helped train more than 140,000 healthcare workers through the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief since the program was re-authorized in 2008, Africa still needs more than one million healthcare workers to address a critical shortage, U.S. Global AIDS Ambassador Dr. Deborah Birx said Monday at a Capitol Hill briefing. Speakers at the briefing, which was organized by the Frontline Health Workers Coalition, IntraHealth, and the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, said no disease requires more healthcare workers in Africa than HIV. Author: Rabita Aziz

5 ways to end AIDS by 2030

5 ways to end AIDS by 2030

When it started in the early 1980s, everyone was scared. No one knew how to help the people who were filling U.S. hospitals and then swiftly dying, or what to do for others suffering the same fate around the world. It was 1984 when one U.S. health official expressed hope for a vaccine within two years. Author: Margarite Nathe 

World AIDS Day 2015

World AIDS Day 2015

Around the world, World AIDS Day is being commemorated by millions of people. Today, we celebrate the incredible progress that has been made in the fight against the disease and the millions of lives that have been saved, honour those who have died in the struggle, and show our support for those people living with HIV. Today we also look ahead, with the commitment to end the epidemic by 2030. Source: The Global Fund

Safeguarding human health in the Anthropocene epoch: report of The Rockefeller Foundation–Lancet Commission on planetary health

Safeguarding human health in the Anthropocene epoch: report of The Rockefeller Foundation–Lancet Commission on planetary health

Executive Summary By almost any measure, human health is better now than at any time in history. Life expectancy has soared from 47 years in 1950–1955, to 69 years in 2005–2010, and death rates in children younger than 5 years of age have decreased substantially, from 214 per thousand live births in 1950–1955, to 59 in 2005–2010. But these gains in human health have come at a high price: the degradation of nature’s ecological systems on a scale never seen in human history. A growing body of evidence shows that the health of humanity is intrinsically linked to the health...

We are the generation that can stop AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

We are the generation that can stop AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

“We are the generation that can stop AIDS, TB and malaria.” That was the main message from Mark Dybul, Executive Director of the Global Fund, in an inspiring interview on France 24’s English language program “The Interview”. Dr. Dybul shared the Global Fund’s impressive results, including 17 million lives saved since 2002, 8.1 million people on antiretroviral therapy for HIV, 13.2 million people who have received TB treatment, and 548 million mosquito nets distributed to fight malaria. Source: Theglobalfund.org

Millions More Need H.I.V. Treatment, W.H.O. Says

Millions More Need H.I.V. Treatment, W.H.O. Says

The World Health Organization issued sweeping new guidelines on Wednesday that could put millions more people on H.I.V. drugs than are now getting them. The recommendations could go a long way toward halting the epidemic, health officials say, but would cost untold billions of dollars not yet committed. Author: Donald G. McNeil Jr. for the New York Times

TB overtakes HIV/AIDS as leading infectious disease killer

TB overtakes HIV/AIDS as leading infectious disease killer

Tuberculosis killed 1.5 million people in 2014 – moving ahead of HIV/AIDS, which was responsible for 1.2 million deaths in the same year. The rise of tuberculosis  (TB) is evidence of both the gains made against HIV/AIDS in the past two decades and the silent growth of one of the world’s oldest killers. Making matters worse is the spread of multidrug-resistant forms of the disease. Author: Tom Murphy for Humanosphere